Exercise 3 – Boy meets girl

Exercise 3 – boy meets girl 3 panel

The focus was on a 3 comic panel story about a boy/girl meets boy/girl and explain in 3 panels how they meet, fall out then reconnect.

Some examples of successful 3 panel comics are:

Garfield – humourous in 3 panels.

Garfield
Calvin and Hobbes
Maya Gosling

What is a 3 panel comic?

It is a story told in 3 acts in 3 panels.  It is often humourous or philosophical and humorous and it has a clear beginning, middle and end.  The first panel introduces the situation, the second panel introduces the conflict/drama and the third concludes it or offers the resolution, often in a punchline format.

For this exercise I chose a situation that would be awkward.  A boy meets girl at the wedding of an ex-partner.  The inspiration came to me while watching a movie about being caught in a time loop at someone’s wedding.  The movie, Palm Springs, was focused on the endless time-loop between the Maid of Honour and a random guest.  It wasn’t bad, but it did help with my brainstorm:

WEDDING:  guests, awkward moments, ex-partners, vows, objections, staying silent, wedding crashers, chaos, dresses, flowers, venues, disasters, revenge, sabotage.

Three words for developing:   awkward moments/ex-partners/objection

The script :

Green = first panel           Yellow = second panel                    Red = punchline/last panel

Boy:    Hi! I’m Jake!  Do you know Millie?

Girl:     Yes.  She was my roommate in college.

Boy:    Do you know Tom?

Girl:     Yes, he was my boyfriend in college.

Boy:    Isn’t that where they met?

Girl:     Yes, in my room.

Boy:    So, you’re Jen?

Girl:     Yes.

Boy:    Why did you come to the wedding?

Girl:     To object.

Boy:    Me too.

The setting:

Two people outside the church, waiting to go in and waiting to be seated start up a conversation.  They appear uninterested in each other at first, then the reason for their presence at the wedding is revealed and they find each other interesting.  The background shows somewhere hot and exotic.

The characters:

Tall man, late 20’s/early 30s, wears a Kennedy blue suit.  The blue is to blend in with the party.

Medium height woman, also late 20’s/early 30s, wears a red suit with hat – the red symbolises revenge and assertion.

Panel positions:

3 wide panels, top to bottom in portrait form on A4.

Edits and final images:

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This image was fine but I found that although the red was a good contrast for the blue, the suit was brilliant for a wedding guest.  It felt too formal.  I wanted to go for something a little less formal but still appropriate.  I did like her eyes but it wasn’t in keeping with the style of the man.

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I adjusted the colours and muted the blue to have a slightly more pinkish tone and I changed the style of the woman to have a more stylish dress in a hot pink rather than striking red.  It was still strong enough to show someone had dress up for the occasion, but it wasn’t too striking as to be a passionate revenge red or vixen red.  It also complimented the pink love hearts in the last panel.

The final image was created by adding a block of pink and setting the layer to screen.  It helped everything to have a glow of pink off it, the background settled a bit and it allowed for a lovely sun-drenched vibe to the location and adding to the setting of a love soaked wedding, which contrasts nicely with their intent.

Edits and final images:

This image was fine but I found that although the red was a good contrast for the blue, the suit was brilliant for a wedding guest.  It felt too formal.  I wanted to go for something a little less formal but still appropriate.  I did like her eyes but it wasn’t in keeping with the style of the man.

I adjusted the colours and muted the blue to have a slightly more pinkish tone and I changed the style of the woman to have a more stylish dress in a hot pink rather than striking red.  It was still strong enough to show someone had dress up for the occasion, but it wasn’t too striking as to be a passionate revenge red or vixen red.  It also complimented the pink love hearts in the last panel.

The final image was created by adding a block of pink and setting the layer to screen.  It helped everything to have a glow of pink off it, the background settled a bit and it allowed for a lovely sun-drenched vibe to the location and adding to the setting of a love soaked wedding, which contrasts nicely with their intent.

Ref:

Tim Stout (2011) How to use the three act story structure in comic strips

https://timstout.wordpress.com/2011/09/03/how-to-use-3-act-story-structure-in-comic-strips/

[accessed 01.08.2021]

GOcomics (2021) six creators who consistently nail the three panel structure

https://www.gocomics.com/blog/4635/six-creators-who-consistently-nail-the-three-panel-structure

[accessed 01.08.2021]

Mya Gosling(2014)Three panel plays

https://goodticklebrain.com/three-panel-plays

[accessed 01.08.2021]